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Champ Jaxon May 13, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Life Balance, Mindfulness, Music & Dance, People.
13 comments

Champ Jaxon has been playing guitar for a couple of years and has gained a degree of proficiency rarely seen in pre-teens.

He’s already appeared on stage with the Marshall Tucker Band and on national television on the Ellen Degeneres show.

He doesn’t know where he’s going . . . but he’s knows where he was grown:

Aah . . . that’s better!

Biking Makes Me Feel Young! May 11, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Happiness, Health & Wellness, Life Balance, Nature.
17 comments

It’s National Bike Month.

What a great opportunity to pump up your tires, kick up your kickstand, and hit the road.

Biking is good for your health and good for the planet.  It’s also good for your wallet ~> no need to head to the filling station, saving big bucks!

Since moving to Florida, I ride most days because: (1) Florida is warm year-round; (2) Florida is flat as a pancake; and (3) hopping on my bike to ride up to the clubhouse or around the neighborhood makes me feel like a kid again:

WHEEEE!!!!!

Do you still bike?  If so, share a bike tale or trail in the comments.

If not, want some incentive to get biking this month?  Here’s a score card to play Bike Month Bingo:

To learn more, visit the League of American Bicyclists at bikeleague.org

Aah . . . that’s better!

Friendships May 9, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Life Balance, People.
28 comments

I read an article by Julie Beck in The Atlantic this weekend that got me thinking:

How Friendships Change Over Time.

The author addressed how our childhood friendships evolve as we head off to college, graduate, get married, have kids, start work, move across the country, care for parents, etc.

Increased responsibilities and demands on our time coupled with the lack of contiguity often mean that friendships, even longstanding friendships, fade.

We no longer see our companions on a daily basis to hang out, listen to records, play Frisbee, pop popcorn, and chat about anything and everything.

Instead, we make plans to get together . . . in two weeks time.

Friendships, like ships, diverge as we chart our life course.

Years ago, we “stayed in touch” with our compadres with annual missives at Yuletide which recounted the highlights (or low lights) of the year.  Now, with the advent of Facebook, Twitter, Instagram, we are able keep tabs on each other year round . . . without ever really connecting:

If you never see your friends in person, you’re not really sharing experiences so much as just keeping each other updated on your separate lives. It becomes a relationship based on storytelling rather than shared living—not bad, just not the same.

Via social media, we give our followers a “heads up” on the happenings in our life and they give us a “thumbs up” to acknowledge that they saw what we said.

But is that enough to maintain ties?

Probably not.

Friendships based solely on storytelling aren’t apt to have the same depth and dimension as those based on getting together on a regular basis to do something . . . together.

“If we only have the Facebook tie, that’s probably a friendship that’s in greater jeopardy of not surviving into the future,” Ledbetter says.

* * *

Social media makes it possible to maintain more friendships, but more shallowly. And it can also keep relationships on life support that would (and maybe should) otherwise have died out.

Oh, for the days when we “hung out” with our friends every day.

Not in chat rooms, but in person.

Without having to “tidy up” first.

Aah . . . that’s better!

 

Cajun Moon May 7, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Exercise & Fitness, Music & Dance.
10 comments

At Water Aerobics, we listen to multiple genres of upbeat music ~ Rock, Classic Rock, Disco, Country, Motown, Soul, and even Blues . . . which isn’t known for being upbeat, but occasionally surprises.

This week, Cajun Moon, a blues tune by J.J. Cale grabbed my attention.

Here it is:

And here’s a tribute to J.J. Cale’s Cajun Moon by Clapton & Friends:

Want to hear the Very Best of J.J. Cale?

Music moves me . . . and always gets me moving

Aah . . . that’s better!

Stay Curious May 5, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Humor, Magick & Mystery, Mindfulness, People.
17 comments

I think, at a child’s birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift should be curiosity.

— Eleanor Roosevelt, former First Lady of the United States

Like Pooh, I’m just curious . . . what do you think?

Would inventors, like Edison and Ford, have invented anything without curiosity?

Would explorers, like Columbus and Magellan, have explored without curiosity?

Would cooks, like Andrew Zimmern, experiment in the kitchen without curiosity?

Would anyone have eaten a lobster without curiosity?

Aah . . . stay curious!

What Day Is It? May 3, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Humor, Magick & Mystery, Mindfulness.
14 comments

The Great Courses lecture series is an extensive collection of home study courses in areas of Art, Science, Math, Philosophy, Brain Fitness, etc.  Our local library offers a number of the Great Courses on DVD, often with an accompanying handbook.

One series that contains some FUN “party tricks” is The Secrets of Mental Math, presented by Professor Arthur T. Benjamin (an “engaging, entertaining, and insightful” lecturer).

From Professor Benjamin’s series of 12 lectures on Mental Math, I learned, inter alia, tips on Calendar Calculating.

What’s that, you ask?

Calendar Calculating allows you to determine the day of the week for a specific date without flipping through a calendar.

Note:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  

To each his own.

The basic formula is: Month Code + Date + Year Code (minus multiples of 7) = Day of the Week.

(Month, Day of the Week, and Year Codes are discussed below.)

A quick example:

July 4, 2022 = 5 (month code) + 4 (date) + 6 (year code for 2022) = 15

From that sum, subtract “14” (to eliminate multiples of 7).  The resulting sum of “1” means that July 4th this year will land on a Monday . . . 

Go ahead.  Check your calendar.  We’ll wait.

Huzzah!  A 3-day weekend for those of us in the USA celebrating our independence!

Here’s another example from this year:

October 31, 2022 = 6 (month code) + 31 (date) + 6 (year code) = 43 – 42 = 1 = Monday


Reminder:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  

No judgment from me.

Days of the Week Codes (these are pretty obvious):

Monday = 1
Tuesday = 2
Wednesday = 3
Thursday = 4
Friday = 5
Saturday = 6
Sunday = 7 (or 0 because 7-7 = 0)

In order to perform the calculations quickly, you will need to memorize 12 Month Codes.  It helps to have a quick pneumonic device for each month:

January = 6 (W-I-N-T-E-R has 6 letters) (January = 5 in a leap year)*
February = 2 (2nd month) (February = 1 in a leap year)*
March = 2 (March 2 the beat!)
April = 5 (A-P-R-I-L or F-O-O-L-S has 5 letters)
May = 0 (Hold the May-0)
June = 3 (June B-U-G)
July = 5 (F-I-V-E-R Works!)
August = 1 (“A” is the 1st letter of the alphabet)
September = 4 (F-A-L-L has 4 letters)
October = 6 (T-R-I-C-K-S or T-R-E-A-T-S has 6 letters)
November = 2 (in the US, Thanksgiving = 2-rkey day)
December = 4 (X-M-A-S or L-A-S-T has 4 letters)

*In a leap year, January has a code of 6 – 1 = 5 (because no leap has occurred yet) and February has a code of 2 – 1 = 1 (for the same reason).

Example:  January 1st, 2000 (a leap year) = 5 + 1 + 0 = 6 ~> Saturday!

The “why” behind these code numbers is due to the length of each month.  Since 28 days is a multiple of 7, February and March start on the same day of the week (EXCEPT in a leap year) because February has 28 days (EXCEPT in a leap year).

The rationale for the other months is similar:

March has 31 days which is 3 days longer than 28 so we add 3 to the code for March (2) to calculate that April’s code = 5.

April has 30 days which is 2 days longer than 28 so we add 2 to its code of 5 to get “7” for May.  After subtracting out 7 (to reduce by multiples of 7), May’s code is “0.”

As I noted above:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  I hear ya.  

So does Goofy!

Year Codes

To calculate the Year Code for a specific year, the formula is Year (just the last 2 digits) + Leap Years (divide the year’s last 2 digits by 4 and ignore the remainder) + Year Code for the Century.   The resulting sums are reduced by multiples of 7.  Why?  That’s just the way it is.

Here are the Century Codes:

1600 = 0
1700 = 5
1800 = 3
1900 = 1
2000 = 0

Example:  The year code for 2022 = 22 + 5 (22/4 = 5 leaps)+ 0 (century code) = 27 – 21 (to reduce by multiples of 7) = 6

Just for fun, calculate today’s date to see if it conforms:

May 3, 2022 = 0 (Month Code) + 3 (date) + 6 (year code) = 9 – 7 = 2 and 2 = Tuesday

GO YOU!  You are catching on QUICK!

Note:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  

For those of you who want to dive in . . ..

Here are the year codes for the first 32 years this century:

2001 (1)  2002 (2)  2003 (3)  2004 (5)  2005 (6)  2006 (0)  2007 (1)  2008 (3)

2009 (4)  2010 (5)  2011 (6)  2012 (1)  2013 (2)  2014 (3)  2015 (4)  2016 (6)

2017 (0)  2018 (1)  2019 (2)  2020 (4)  2021 (5)  2022 (6)  2023 (0)  2024 (2)

2025 (3)  2026 (4)  2027 (5)  2028 (0)  2029 (1)  2030 (2)  2031 (3)  2032 (5)

Since year codes repeat every 28 years (from 1901 through 2099), for years like 2030, you can delete multiples of 28 to make mental calculations easier:

October 31, 2030 = 6 + 31 + 2 (year code)= 39 – 35 = 4 = Thursday

The same is true for the last century ~ reduce the year (1998) by multiples of 28:

1998 – 28 = 1970 – 28 = 1942 – 28 = 1914

Due to the repeating nature of year codes, July 4, 1998 fell on the same day of the week as July 4, 1970, July 4, 1942, and July 4, 1914.

As a result, it’s easiest to reduce to 1914 first and then calculate the year code:

14 (year) + 3 (14 / 4 = 3 leaps) + 1 (century code for 1900) = 18 – 14 = 4 is the year code for 1914 . . . as well as for 1942 & 1970 & 1998.

And that makes sense:

If the year code for 1998 = 4 . . . then the code for 1999 = 5 . . . and the code for 2000 (a leap year) = 5 + 2 = 7 – 7 (to reduce by multiples of 7) = 0 and we know that’s correct since we know that the year code for 2000 is 0.

Returning to our Calendar Calculation, you’ll be happy to know that July 4, 1998 fell on a Saturday:

5 (Month Code) + 4 (Date) + 4 (Year Code) = 13 – 7 = 6 = Saturday!

You are getting the hang of this!  Take a bow!

The year codes repeat every 28 years (from 1901 through 2099) because the calendar shifts 28 times for the years PLUS 7 times for the leap years:  28 + 7 = 35.  Since 35 is a multiple of 7, the days of the week stay the same.

1900 and 2100 are NOT leap years.

Quick Tip:  To perform Calendar Calculations as a party trick using Mental Math, start by calculating the Year Code before asking for the Month and date.

If someone born on December 25, 1960 wants you to calculate the day of the week they were born, ask for the Year first:

Year code = 1960 – 28 – 28 = 1904 = 4 + 1 (leap) + 1 (century code) = 6

December 25, 1960 = 4 + 25 + 6 = 35 – 35 = 0 = Sunday

And, if they’re wondering, being born on a Sunday is good news (at least for those of certain religious persuasions):

Monday’s child is fair of face
Tuesday’s child is full of grace
Wednesday’s child is full of woe 
Thursday’s child has far to go
Friday’s child is loving and giving
Saturday’s child has to work for a living
And the child who is born on the Sabbath Day, is bonny, blithe, good and gay.

OK, that’s it.

Go forth and calculate!

Foot Note:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  

Mickey is OK with that.  So am I!

Aah . . . Math is FUN-da-mental!

I’ve Got Dibs! May 1, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Blogging, Humor, Music & Dance.
20 comments

I’ve been ignoring blog maintenance since Easter.

When I went to the Spam Filter to toss out the trash, I found it populated with 237+ Spam Messages, predominantly from the Dibs.

More specifically, I found multiple messages from William Dib, Mark Dib, Ugo Dib, Wim Dib, Paul Dib, and Ash Dib.

As well as multiple messages from Lisa Dib, Boo Dib, Mary Dib, Jane Dib, Mia Dib, Ivy Dib.

Suffice it to say, I’ve got Dibs on anything I want for the foreseeable future:

To call dibs, you usually actually say (or shout) dibs, especially while mentioning the thing you’re claiming, as in Dibs on the last slice of pizza! If you’ve got dibs, you consider yourself to have the right to the thing that you’ve made a claim to. Dibs is very informal and is mostly used by kids.

Here’s someone else who’s calling Dibs:

Aah . . . that’s better!

 

Happy Easter April 17, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Humor, Joke.
22 comments

Here comes Peter Cottontail . . .

And Fast Eddy the Easter Frog . . .

IMGP3555b

Hopping down the bunny trail . . .

Hippity Happily Easter’s on its way . . .

Just remember, Easter’s not all about bunnies and baskets

It’s also about The Resurrection.

Which is NOT something you want to try at home by playing possum . . .

Unless you want to end up in a line up with a bunch of peeps after being charged with DUI!

Or worse!

P.S.  No chocolate was harmed in the posting of this post!

 

The Funky Pelican in Flagler Beach March 29, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Art & Photography, Home & Garden, Travel & Leisure.
29 comments

We stopped for an early dinner at the Funky Pelican in Flagler Beach.

We enjoyed the view from our table despite the persistent rainfall.

After eating, we admired the pier from another vantage point.

Listening to the roar of the surf is . . .

Just BEACHY!

We drove home through Ocala National Forest and made a quick pit-stop at Barberville’s Yard Art Emporium.

 

The Yard Art Emporium had a bit of everything you might need in the way of Yard Art.

From Big Boy to Big Roosters.

From Alien visitors to stunning statuary.

Including a Friendly Frog!

And just a few short hours and many miles later . . .

Aah . . . HOME at last!

The Casements & Mala Compra March 27, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Home & Garden, Life Balance, People, Travel & Leisure.
18 comments

After a delicious breakfast at the hotel, we drove up A1A from Port Orange to Ormond Beach.

In Ormond, we toured The Casements ~ John D. Rockefeller’s winter home in Ormond Beach.

The Casements, named for the large hand-cut casement windows that adorn the mansion, has been beautifully restored to function as the Cultural Center for the City of Ormond Beach, Florida. Set on the shore of the Halifax River, and just two blocks from the Atlantic Ocean, the late John D. Rockefeller’s winter home is known as “The Jewel of Ormond Beach.” The Casements has been officially listed on the National Register of Historic Places and has been designated as a Florida Heritage Site.

Our tour guide informed us that John D. Rockefeller, the richest man in America and the world’s first billionaire, told his doctor that he wanted to live to be 100.

His doctor recommended that he winter in Florida or Egypt.

Following his doctor’s advice, Rockefeller wintered in Florida and made it to age 97, playing golf every day well into his 90’s!

Mr. Rockefeller and his Butler

Located on the eastern bank of the Halifax River, John D. Rockefeller purchased [The Casements] in 1918 and lived in the house during the winters until his death in 1937 at the age of ninety-seven. While a resident of Ormond Beach, “Neighbor John,” as he preferred to be called, enjoyed taking part in community activities: playing golf, participating in the sing-along at the Ormond Hotel each Sunday, and entertaining friends such as Thomas Edison, Henry Ford and Harvey Firestone.

After the tour, we continued north on A1A, stopping to have a picnic (in the car) while overlooking the Atlantic Ocean amid drizzling rain and fog.

Quite atmospheric, no?

After lunch, we checked out the ruins of the Mala Compra Plantation.

In the early 19th century, the plantation was home to Joseph Hernandez, who served as everything from a brigadier general in the U.S. Army to a committee member who helped select Tallahassee as the state capital. The site is part of Bing’s Landing, an eight-acre county park that also includes a boat launch, fishing pier, and picnic and playground facilities.

Flagler County pursued archaeological grants to study the physical evidence of Hernandez’ plantation, and then more grants to create a permanent display at the site.

“Normally when archaeologists dig, they take the artifacts and then cover the site back up,” says Sisco Deen, the archive curator for the Flagler County Historical Society. “With this one, we got the artifacts, but they left the dig.”

Today, visitors can walk on an elevated boardwalk around the perimeter of the plantation remains and read interpretive displays that explain the site’s historical and cultural value.

The archeological site is protected with a roof overhead to preserve the site including the old coquina well.

Located on the Halifax, Mala Compra (which translates to “Bad Bargain”) has excellent views.

And some crazy vines!

Just made for swinging!

Aah . . . that’s better!