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Stay Curious May 5, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Humor, Magick & Mystery, Mindfulness, People.
17 comments

I think, at a child’s birth, if a mother could ask a fairy godmother to endow it with the most useful gift, that gift should be curiosity.

— Eleanor Roosevelt, former First Lady of the United States

Like Pooh, I’m just curious . . . what do you think?

Would inventors, like Edison and Ford, have invented anything without curiosity?

Would explorers, like Columbus and Magellan, have explored without curiosity?

Would cooks, like Andrew Zimmern, experiment in the kitchen without curiosity?

Would anyone have eaten a lobster without curiosity?

Aah . . . stay curious!

What Day Is It? May 3, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Humor, Magick & Mystery, Mindfulness.
14 comments

The Great Courses lecture series is an extensive collection of home study courses in areas of Art, Science, Math, Philosophy, Brain Fitness, etc.  Our local library offers a number of the Great Courses on DVD, often with an accompanying handbook.

One series that contains some FUN “party tricks” is The Secrets of Mental Math, presented by Professor Arthur T. Benjamin (an “engaging, entertaining, and insightful” lecturer).

From Professor Benjamin’s series of 12 lectures on Mental Math, I learned, inter alia, tips on Calendar Calculating.

What’s that, you ask?

Calendar Calculating allows you to determine the day of the week for a specific date without flipping through a calendar.

Note:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  

To each his own.

The basic formula is: Month Code + Date + Year Code (minus multiples of 7) = Day of the Week.

(Month, Day of the Week, and Year Codes are discussed below.)

A quick example:

July 4, 2022 = 5 (month code) + 4 (date) + 6 (year code for 2022) = 15

From that sum, subtract “14” (to eliminate multiples of 7).  The resulting sum of “1” means that July 4th this year will land on a Monday . . . 

Go ahead.  Check your calendar.  We’ll wait.

Huzzah!  A 3-day weekend for those of us in the USA celebrating our independence!

Here’s another example from this year:

October 31, 2022 = 6 (month code) + 31 (date) + 6 (year code) = 43 – 42 = 1 = Monday


Reminder:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  

No judgment from me.

Days of the Week Codes (these are pretty obvious):

Monday = 1
Tuesday = 2
Wednesday = 3
Thursday = 4
Friday = 5
Saturday = 6
Sunday = 7 (or 0 because 7-7 = 0)

In order to perform the calculations quickly, you will need to memorize 12 Month Codes.  It helps to have a quick pneumonic device for each month:

January = 6 (W-I-N-T-E-R has 6 letters) (January = 5 in a leap year)*
February = 2 (2nd month) (February = 1 in a leap year)*
March = 2 (March 2 the beat!)
April = 5 (A-P-R-I-L or F-O-O-L-S has 5 letters)
May = 0 (Hold the May-0)
June = 3 (June B-U-G)
July = 5 (F-I-V-E-R Works!)
August = 1 (“A” is the 1st letter of the alphabet)
September = 4 (F-A-L-L has 4 letters)
October = 6 (T-R-I-C-K-S or T-R-E-A-T-S has 6 letters)
November = 2 (in the US, Thanksgiving = 2-rkey day)
December = 4 (X-M-A-S or L-A-S-T has 4 letters)

*In a leap year, January has a code of 6 – 1 = 5 (because no leap has occurred yet) and February has a code of 2 – 1 = 1 (for the same reason).

Example:  January 1st, 2000 (a leap year) = 5 + 1 + 0 = 6 ~> Saturday!

The “why” behind these code numbers is due to the length of each month.  Since 28 days is a multiple of 7, February and March start on the same day of the week (EXCEPT in a leap year) because February has 28 days (EXCEPT in a leap year).

The rationale for the other months is similar:

March has 31 days which is 3 days longer than 28 so we add 3 to the code for March (2) to calculate that April’s code = 5.

April has 30 days which is 2 days longer than 28 so we add 2 to its code of 5 to get “7” for May.  After subtracting out 7 (to reduce by multiples of 7), May’s code is “0.”

As I noted above:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  I hear ya.  

So does Goofy!

Year Codes

To calculate the Year Code for a specific year, the formula is Year (just the last 2 digits) + Leap Years (divide the year’s last 2 digits by 4 and ignore the remainder) + Year Code for the Century.   The resulting sums are reduced by multiples of 7.  Why?  That’s just the way it is.

Here are the Century Codes:

1600 = 0
1700 = 5
1800 = 3
1900 = 1
2000 = 0

Example:  The year code for 2022 = 22 + 5 (22/4 = 5 leaps)+ 0 (century code) = 27 – 21 (to reduce by multiples of 7) = 6

Just for fun, calculate today’s date to see if it conforms:

May 3, 2022 = 0 (Month Code) + 3 (date) + 6 (year code) = 9 – 7 = 2 and 2 = Tuesday

GO YOU!  You are catching on QUICK!

Note:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  

For those of you who want to dive in . . ..

Here are the year codes for the first 32 years this century:

2001 (1)  2002 (2)  2003 (3)  2004 (5)  2005 (6)  2006 (0)  2007 (1)  2008 (3)

2009 (4)  2010 (5)  2011 (6)  2012 (1)  2013 (2)  2014 (3)  2015 (4)  2016 (6)

2017 (0)  2018 (1)  2019 (2)  2020 (4)  2021 (5)  2022 (6)  2023 (0)  2024 (2)

2025 (3)  2026 (4)  2027 (5)  2028 (0)  2029 (1)  2030 (2)  2031 (3)  2032 (5)

Since year codes repeat every 28 years (from 1901 through 2099), for years like 2030, you can delete multiples of 28 to make mental calculations easier:

October 31, 2030 = 6 + 31 + 2 (year code)= 39 – 35 = 4 = Thursday

The same is true for the last century ~ reduce the year (1998) by multiples of 28:

1998 – 28 = 1970 – 28 = 1942 – 28 = 1914

Due to the repeating nature of year codes, July 4, 1998 fell on the same day of the week as July 4, 1970, July 4, 1942, and July 4, 1914.

As a result, it’s easiest to reduce to 1914 first and then calculate the year code:

14 (year) + 3 (14 / 4 = 3 leaps) + 1 (century code for 1900) = 18 – 14 = 4 is the year code for 1914 . . . as well as for 1942 & 1970 & 1998.

And that makes sense:

If the year code for 1998 = 4 . . . then the code for 1999 = 5 . . . and the code for 2000 (a leap year) = 5 + 2 = 7 – 7 (to reduce by multiples of 7) = 0 and we know that’s correct since we know that the year code for 2000 is 0.

Returning to our Calendar Calculation, you’ll be happy to know that July 4, 1998 fell on a Saturday:

5 (Month Code) + 4 (Date) + 4 (Year Code) = 13 – 7 = 6 = Saturday!

You are getting the hang of this!  Take a bow!

The year codes repeat every 28 years (from 1901 through 2099) because the calendar shifts 28 times for the years PLUS 7 times for the leap years:  28 + 7 = 35.  Since 35 is a multiple of 7, the days of the week stay the same.

1900 and 2100 are NOT leap years.

Quick Tip:  To perform Calendar Calculations as a party trick using Mental Math, start by calculating the Year Code before asking for the Month and date.

If someone born on December 25, 1960 wants you to calculate the day of the week they were born, ask for the Year first:

Year code = 1960 – 28 – 28 = 1904 = 4 + 1 (leap) + 1 (century code) = 6

December 25, 1960 = 4 + 25 + 6 = 35 – 35 = 0 = Sunday

And, if they’re wondering, being born on a Sunday is good news (at least for those of certain religious persuasions):

Monday’s child is fair of face
Tuesday’s child is full of grace
Wednesday’s child is full of woe 
Thursday’s child has far to go
Friday’s child is loving and giving
Saturday’s child has to work for a living
And the child who is born on the Sabbath Day, is bonny, blithe, good and gay.

OK, that’s it.

Go forth and calculate!

Foot Note:  Some of you will get a kick out of Calendar Calculating.  Others will wish to stick with a paper calendar to check the day of the week for a given day.  

Mickey is OK with that.  So am I!

Aah . . . Math is FUN-da-mental!

I’ve Got Dibs! May 1, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Blogging, Humor, Music & Dance.
20 comments

I’ve been ignoring blog maintenance since Easter.

When I went to the Spam Filter to toss out the trash, I found it populated with 237+ Spam Messages, predominantly from the Dibs.

More specifically, I found multiple messages from William Dib, Mark Dib, Ugo Dib, Wim Dib, Paul Dib, and Ash Dib.

As well as multiple messages from Lisa Dib, Boo Dib, Mary Dib, Jane Dib, Mia Dib, Ivy Dib.

Suffice it to say, I’ve got Dibs on anything I want for the foreseeable future:

To call dibs, you usually actually say (or shout) dibs, especially while mentioning the thing you’re claiming, as in Dibs on the last slice of pizza! If you’ve got dibs, you consider yourself to have the right to the thing that you’ve made a claim to. Dibs is very informal and is mostly used by kids.

Here’s someone else who’s calling Dibs:

Aah . . . that’s better!

 

Happy Easter April 17, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Humor, Joke.
22 comments

Here comes Peter Cottontail . . .

And Fast Eddy the Easter Frog . . .

IMGP3555b

Hopping down the bunny trail . . .

Hippity Happily Easter’s on its way . . .

Just remember, Easter’s not all about bunnies and baskets

It’s also about The Resurrection.

Which is NOT something you want to try at home by playing possum . . .

Unless you want to end up in a line up with a bunch of peeps after being charged with DUI!

Or worse!

P.S.  No chocolate was harmed in the posting of this post!

 

May Thanks Be Given January 9, 2022

Posted by nrhatch in Gratitude, Happiness, Humor, Life Balance, Mindfulness.
22 comments

A few quotes to switch on the light, illuminate the recesses, and reframe our perspective:

* It isn’t what you have, or who you are, or where you are, or what you are doing that makes you happy or unhappy.  It is what you think about. ~ Dale Carnegie

* The reason people find it so hard to be happy is that they always see the past  better than it was, the present worse than it is, and the future less resolved than it will be. ~ Marcel Pagnol

* The best and most beautiful things in the world cannot be seen or even touched. They must be felt with the heart. ~ Helen Keller

One last parting thought:

May we stay resolved to each breath,
each act, each moment being enjoyed,
and may thanks be given,
regardless of the setbacks.

~ Jim O’Connor (Issue 13, HERON DANCE)

Here’s to enjoying the journey as each moment unfolds into the next.

Aah . . . that’s better!

If The Stepford Wives Had Kids . . . December 12, 2021

Posted by nrhatch in Humor, Joke, Less IS More, Life Balance.
14 comments

Don’t waste your money on expensive tech toys for Stepford Kids . . .

explore the gift shop

Just give them a snow globe to share!

Aah . . . that’s the ticket!

Let’s Talk Turkey November 9, 2021

Posted by nrhatch in Food & Drink, Gratitude, Happiness, Humor.
19 comments

“Each Thanksgiving, I’m thankful that I was born a parrot and not a turkey.”

“I say, I say, I say . . . being a rooster this time of year is more better than being a turkey.”

~ Foghorn Leghorn

“What?  Stop looking at me!  I’m not a turkey.  I’m a cow.  MOO!”

“I am not a turkey.  I am not a turkey.  I am not a turkey.  I am not a turkey.”

“Well, I’m a turkey and proud of it.  Of course, if I’m on your dinner table . . . it’ll be as a place holder or name tag NOT as the main course.”

~ Greta Gobbler

Aah . . . that’s better!

Spring Forward . . . Fall Back! November 6, 2021

Posted by nrhatch in Health & Wellness, Humor, Life Balance.
6 comments

Today is the last day of daylight savings time for many of us.  We lose an hour in the Spring and reclaim it in the Fall.

As you “Fall Back” tonight . . .

Please take any necessary precautions to avoid serious injury.

Aah . . . that’s better!

And Now For Something Really Scary October 31, 2021

Posted by nrhatch in Happiness, Humor, Joke, Travel & Leisure.
16 comments

In honor of the hallowed holiday of Halloween and All Hallow’s Eve, please enjoy some scary and spine-tingling sights encountered on our recent Tallahassee trip.

First up, imagine Ron Weasley meeting this Beastie in the Forbidden Forest ~ he’d be as petrified as he would be on encountering a dementor.

Like this one.

Here’s an eye-opener from our morning stroll at Goodwood Museum and Gardens ~> what’s left of the Greenhouse after howling hurricane force winds stripped it bare back in 1985.

You would think they’d have managed to tidy up after 36 years.  Just saying.

But the scariest sight by far?  Scarier than ghosts and ghouls and goblins . . . and things that go bump in the night?

A truly frightening sight?

Three determined Girl Scouts selling Girl Scout cookies who refused to accept “NO” at face value.

Have a Spook-tacular Halloween!

Mission San Luis October 29, 2021

Posted by nrhatch in Home & Garden, Humor, People, Travel & Leisure.
16 comments

On our last morning in the Panhandle, we visited Mission San Luis, a recreated 17th century Mission and Appalachee Village, which over 1500 souls called “home” in the late 1600’s.  The Spaniards burned it down in 1704 to prevent it from being captured by the British.

The Council House (used by the Appalachee for gatherings and meetings) provided insight into its interior construction since it’s being re-thatched.

Although the building appears circular, it has 80 sides, which creates the illusion of a rounded facade.

The supporting posts are straight and true and L-O-N-G!  They go UP and UP and UP.

Inside the Council House are benches for reclining dignitaries.

Appalachee Indians spent most of the day outside, using their homes for sleeping and storage.  This is the footprint of an Appalachee abode which would have been thatched.

Unlike the Appalachee, most of the Spaniards preferred indoor cooking.

And indoor dining.  (Of course, this was pre-pandemic.)

The Friary also boasted a home office.

Here’s a glimpse of the spartan sleeping arrangements in one of the Spanish homes.  Notice the low tech, wall mounted air conditioning unit . . . perfect for hot summer nights.

When folks got ill, they relied on Medicinal Herbs to revive themselves.  We learned that Rosemary relieves headaches AND enhances memory and concentration ~ a handy herb indeed for seniors in need of all the help they can get!

This shot reveals the interior of the wall allowing visitors to see the construction methods used 300+ years ago.

Also in the Mission is a Blacksmith’s Shop, a Church (which rivaled the Church in St. Augustine), the rest of the Friary, a Fort (complete with ramparts and palisade), and a perfect-for-us picnic area.

Aah . . . that’s better!