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Avoiding A Case Of “My Corona” March 5, 2020

Posted by nrhatch in Health & Wellness, Humor, Less IS More, People.
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New Scientist suggests that people can minimize the risk of infection from coronavirus (or the flu) by practicing “social distancing” and good hygiene:

1. Move at least a meter (or more!) away from anyone who appears ill if you can.

2. Don’t shake hands, hug or kiss people as a greeting.* (See Op-Ed Below).

3. Wash your hands often with soap and water, or use an alcohol hand rub, especially after touching surfaces that might be contaminated.

The World Health Organization (WHO) says there is no need for healthy people to wear face masks.

It also says there is no evidence that pets can get and spread covid-19, or that the virus can be passed on via letters, packages or food.

To read more:  Coronavirus: What You Need To Know (New Scientist)

* * *

* Op-Ed: Tip #2 is good advice

In my opinion, WAY TOO MANY people expect a hug, a kiss, or a hand shake when greeting others . . . even when said people are virtual strangers.

You know the type. Anytime an introduction is made, muscle memory causes them to mindlessly shove their hand forward in a gesture designed to signify, “damn glad to meetcha!”

Before you mindlessly reciprocate, think about this ~> you don’t know where that hand has been OR when said hand was last washed, if ever.  For all you know, it spent the last hour scratching/grooming/cleaning up after a troop of monkeys.

Or, you know, just one filthy monkey.

Since I’ve never been a fan of the hand shake (or of forced hugs and kisses), I’m going to use “Coronavirus Concerns” as a convenient excuse to “bow out” of hellos and good-byes involving any form of physical contact.

Henceforth and herewith, instead of shaking hands, or sharing a perfunctory hug or kiss, I’ll keep a SAFE distance, place MY scrupulously clean palms together, and give a brief nod in greeting:

IMGP3904

Namaste.

It’ll be interesting to see peoples’ reactions, especially those who (on auto pilot) shove their germ-laden mitts forward without first considering whether physical connection/ contact is (a) necessary or (b) desired.

Aah . . . that’s better!

 

Comments»

1. Rivergirl - March 5, 2020

Ah, pandemics. Letting people with social phobias off the hook for centuries…
😉

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

Every cloud has a silver lining ~> thanks to CoronaVirus, I will become a firm advocate of “social distancing.”

L. Marie - March 5, 2020

😄

2. Jill Weatherholt - March 5, 2020

I’ve been driving Derek crazy singing that song! 🙂 I have no problem refusing those extended, germy hands.

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

It’s often seems easier to shake a proffered hand than refuse, but I always feel a bit “germy” afterwards . . . and anxious to wash my hands. Now I have an “easy out” . . .

“WHO asked me NOT to shake hands with you.”
“Who did?”
“WHO did.”

That’ll give them something else to ponder. 😛

3. anotherday2paradise - March 5, 2020

I agree with you, Nancy. I don’t like being kissed by people I barely know. Now, especially with this health scare, I try to keep enough distance between us, so that if they do lunge forward, they’ll fall flat on their face. 🤣

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

Bwahaha! Huggie/kissee types will be bereft if “social distancing” becomes the new norm. While you and I will be dancing in the aisles . . . maintaining a meter’s distance from them. 😆

4. Wandering Cranes - March 5, 2020

I hate the kissing thing, but handshakes are a hard habit to break!! Always was taught it was the respectful and strong form of greeting. It just happens automatically now!

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

Habits are hard to break ~ especially those that happen on auto pilot. If we’re just doing “it” without thinking about doing “it” (whatever “it” is), we need to return to our conscious mind and say, “does this habit still make sense?”

My answer for me ~> NOPE!

5. Tippy Gnu - March 5, 2020

The handshake is a bit of a social dilemma. Some people expect it, and consider others rude or untrustworthy when they refuse a handshake. On the other hand, when I’m about to eat a meal and someone shakes my hand, I now have to worry about what germs will be included with my meal. It would be nice if we adopted the Asian tradition of the gassho. 🙏

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

At this point, I don’t really care if “they” think I’m rude for refusing a handshake . . . I think “they” are rude for expecting me to shake their germy hand.

That’s the tradition I’m planning to adopt:

Henceforth and herewith, instead of shaking hands, or sharing a perfunctory hug or kiss, I’ll keep a SAFE distance, place MY scrupulously clean palms together, and give a brief nod in greeting: Namaste!

6. Kate Crimmins - March 5, 2020

My family is not a physical one. I grew up with no expectation that everyone got kissed or hugged. Those were special and saved for special circumstances. I’m not a fan of handshakes. I once sneezed into my hand (didn’t have time for elbow) and a guy put his hand out to shake mine. Seriously? Did you not see me just spray my hand with saliva? I too am using this as a good reason to reinstate my no touchy policy. Now when it comes to cats, all bets are off. I’ve never gotten sick from a cat.

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

I’ve had that happen too, Kate. It’s because most people are not even thinking about what they are doing . . . they are shaking hands on auto-pilot.

I plan to WAKE THEM UP by bowing and saying Namaste!

Kate Crimmins - March 5, 2020

I certainly don’t want to touch their hands! Not even in church!

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

Don’t get me started on churches/ministers/preachers that issue a weekly edict that everyone should stand and greet everyone else around them with a kiss, a hug, or a handshake.

Um . . . NO!

7. Val Boyko - March 5, 2020

Sending an elbow bump greeting your way Nancy ❣️

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

Elbow bumps are especially appreciated when my hands are full of packages, boxes, and bags! No need to set my bundles aside just to shake hands.

Namaste! _/!\_

8. Ally Bean - March 5, 2020

I’ve been seeing videos of foot bumps. While I appreciate the idea, I wonder exactly how I’d do if that becomes a thing. I mean, I could see me being toppled over by accident while balancing on one foot, being polite.

nrhatch - March 5, 2020

A foot bump in our neighborhood could have catastrophic results, ranging from sprained ankles to stroke. I’ll stick with my planned bow so as not to topple anyone over with a foot bump.

9. Debra - March 6, 2020

I think a short polite bow ought to be the new way to graciously greet someone. Namaste. Touching needs to go! I do wonder if the precautions we’re taking now will disappear when the crisis is over and social expectations will return.

nrhatch - March 6, 2020

I decided on adopting a polite bow before seeing that WHO (and other experts) agree ~> handshaking is a no go! Because so much of our greeting rituals are ingrained, people will most likely return to mindless handshaking with the “social expectation” that we SHOULD reciprocate. I’m just not going to. And if “they” don’t like that I’ve given myself that freedom . . . TOUGH! 😆

10. mybeautfulthings - March 6, 2020

Nicely put! It’s interesting to read about the virus from the US point of view. As we hear it in the news, there is very little in the USA. Reading blogs is much more informative than what we hear on the BBC. 🙂

nrhatch - March 7, 2020

At this point, there are only a limited number of cases in the US, most of them in Washington State, but that number is growing every day ~ more cases and more states.

Stay well.

mybeautfulthings - March 7, 2020

You too. Numbers growing here too but we are being careful……. 🙂


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