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Statement of the Century May 31, 2014

Posted by nrhatch in Humor, Joke.
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BoobsThought from the Greatest Living Scottish Thinker ~ Billy Connolly:

“If women are so bloody perfect at multitasking, how come they can’t have a headache and sex at the same time?”

Source:  e-mail (sent by Joe M.)

 Och . . . that’s just bloody awful!

Do you accept everything people say literally?  Or do you use your creative problem solving skills to look for clues to sarcasm’s subtle deception?

Sarcastic statements are sort of a true lie. You’re saying something you don’t literally mean, and the communication works as intended only if your listener gets that you’re insincere.

Sarcasm has a two-faced quality: it’s both funny and mean. This dual nature has led to contradictory theories on why we use it.

From The Science of Sarcasm? Yeah, Right!

Related posts:  Are You Serious? *  A Touch of Sarcasm

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Comments»

1. Kate @ Did That Just Happen? - May 31, 2014

hehehehehe @ the first one – that’s not right! 🙂

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

Billy Connolly is nothing, if not B~O~L~D. 😎

2. Grannymar - May 31, 2014

I don’t quite believe the JC was the greatest Living Scottish Thinker. In answer to your question, Nancy, I certainly do not accept everything people say literally. Face to face it is easier to see if they are teasing, but across the net? Now that is a horse of a different colour, but we learn with time, how a person’s mind and humour works.

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

I agree, GM. It’s easier to catch sarcasm tossed by those we know in face-to-face encounters with body language clues. I have a tougher time when I’ve just met someone, or have never met them at all (as is the case with some cyber friends).

At times, I’ve had to come out and ask, “Are you serious?” 😎

Grannymar - May 31, 2014

When you ask that question “Are you serious?”, I bet they feel it gives them licence to tease you all the more.

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

That’s definitely what my younger brother does if I’m being clueless. 😎

3. colonialist - May 31, 2014

Now, that is truly PROFOUND!

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

Bwahaha! Oh, wait . . . are you being serious? 😎

colonialist - May 31, 2014

But of course! The man is a genius!

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

Not just a genius . . . a bloody genius!

4. bluebee - May 31, 2014

BC’s a naughty man. But funny 🙂

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

And his Scottish brogue is a BIG plus for me.

5. bluebee - May 31, 2014

“Tear flesh like dogs” – ouch! The origins of the word sarcasm = a case of its bite being worse than its bark 🙀

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

OUCH! I had forgotten its origins . . . thanks for sharing, BB.

6. Jill Weatherholt - May 31, 2014

That’s great, Nancy! I guess I can kind of understand his point. My creative problem solving skills are in high gear every day…you never know what someone is really trying to say.

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

With some, we’re in synch and catch even subtle jokes, pokes, prods, and jests. With others, even their “plain speak” might fly over our heads or under the radar.

It’s great when we have a connection that allows for easy communication and understanding ~ something Don wrote about this week:

http://candidpresence.wordpress.com/2014/05/29/seeing-behind-the-words/

7. nancytex2013 - May 31, 2014

Sarcasm is usually pretty easy for me to spot in conversation, but sometimes a bit tougher to pick up on in writing. That’s why I think so many email/written communications are misconstrued. 🙂

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

Yes! I pick up lots of information from voice inflection that is missing in print communication ~ especially with textspeak.

For example, when someone says ROTFLOL . . . were they REALLY rolling on the floor when they wrote it?

nancytex2013 - May 31, 2014

Snort! Probably not, NH. 🙂

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

I just read your comments about conquering the Canyon on your last post. WOW! You done it!

8. I am J - May 31, 2014

Hah! Good one. Billy Connolly probably speaks for every man since Adam.

Funny, isn’t it? Women can be sick as all-get-out and STILL fix the meals, take care of the kids, and do all the necessary things for the family, but that’s not important to a man if she isn’t all fired-up and “ready” at bedtime. But when a man doesn’t feel well, oh, my.

Sarcasm is a tricky thing. I’m reminded of that old saying, “Many a truth was said in jest.”

I love the old CLASSY sarcastic insults like this one of Golda Meir’s. “Don’t be so humble – you are not that great.”

Or Fred Allen: “I like long walks, especially when they are taken by people who annoy me.”

And the great exchanges between Winston Churchill and Nancy Astor:

Nancy Astor – If you were my husband, I would poison your tea.
Churchill – Madam, if you were my wife, I’d drink it.

I enjoyed this post a lot, Nancy. Can you tell? Sorry, to be so wordy but you got me laughing and remembering…and thinking. 🙂

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

Loved your comment, J ~ from first to last.

I cracked up at the Astor/Churchill exchange. Churchill had some great comebacks ~ what a wit!

I wonder what he was like when he felt “under the weather”?

9. I am J - May 31, 2014

You know, Nancy, I think Winston tipped the bottle a bit so maybe didn’t feel too under the weather as much as under the influence.

Here’s another witty exchange between Lady Astor and Churchill you might enjoy:

Nancy Astor – You’re drunk.
Churchill – And you’re ugly. But in the morning, I shall be sober.

Have a great weekend!

nrhatch - May 31, 2014

I think you’re right . . . he drank. A lot. Up to a QUART of whiskey every evening! Yowsa. He must have been more pickled than W.C. Fields.

I love that exchange too, J. Reminds me of the title of a book by Judge Judy ~ Beauty Fades but Dumb is Forever.

While we’re on the topic of Churchill, you might get a kick out of this:

https://nrhatch.wordpress.com/2012/02/20/a-presidents-day-riposte-and-repost/

10. Nancy Curteman - May 31, 2014

Sarcasm reminds me of the idea that “there is truth in jest.”

nrhatch - June 1, 2014

I agree, NC. When my brothers called me a “moron” . . . I think they meant it. 😎

11. Don - June 1, 2014

AaH! Sarcasm – sensitive enough not to be understood, but so pointed you can get it. The onus is on the one it’s aimed at. Clever. 🙂

nrhatch - June 1, 2014

Sarcasm can be a double edged sword ~> political correctness on the surface with a dig just below.

12. livelytwist - June 1, 2014

Lol, so women aren’t so perfect at multi-tasking after all! 😉

nrhatch - June 1, 2014

Some things are NOT designed for multi-tasking. 😎

13. Three Well Beings - June 2, 2014

I’m not an efficient multi-tasker (I think I once was, but maybe I only thought so!), but the pull to do too much is strong. When I’m actually aware that I’m trying to focus on two, three, four things at once–I stop! It’s the “noticing” that seems to be the problem. 🙂 And sarcasm? It comes so easily…and I don’t like it. It took me a long time to realize how passive aggressive it is. I thought I was just clever. LOL!

nrhatch - June 2, 2014

Yes! We strengthen our ability to NOTICE by stepping into the role of detached observer to watch what’s happening. That shift in perspective gives us a chance to BE PRESENT.

I enjoy sarcasm if it’s not mean-spirited ~ Janna gave a great example below (@ #15).

14. diannegray - June 2, 2014

I just love BC – a very funny man.

I get sarcasm when I know the person, but recently I heard it from a different angle from something an acquaintance said.

This acquaintance talks A LOT about herself – to the point where you can’t get a word in. Here’s how our conversation went:

she: I’m really good at cooking. In fact, I’ve been told I’m the best cook people have ever met.
me: that’s nice
she: Because I’ve traveled the world I’ve learned a lot about cooking.
me: I’m sure you have
she: I really understand people and different cultures except for (and she rolled off about 8 countries she didn’t like) but I really like to talk to people.
me: yes, I’m sure you do
she: People keep telling me I should write a book about my life. In fact, they INSIST I write a book about my life!

Okay, Nancy – you had to be there, but I knew as soon as she said this that people were being sarcastic and she hadn’t picked up on it. I couldn’t say, ‘hey, you talk so much about yourself they were probably trying to give you a hint!’ but I didn’t because I’m pretty sure she would have been insulted 😉

nrhatch - June 2, 2014

Bwahaha! At first, I thought you were going to reveal that SHE was being sarcastic with her claims ~ instead of self-deprecating remarks, she used self-inflating comments, but with a touch of sarcasm laced through her words.

Like Jon Lovitz with his “Get to know me!”

When you got to the punch-line, I ran the conversation through my Sarcasm Detector. “By George, I think you’re right!”

What a great book it would be ~> chapters on cooking, travel, different cultures, and how to pick up on subtle nuances in conversations by enhancing listening skills. 😎

15. jannatwrites - June 2, 2014

Oh, women are still good at multitasking… the Connolly quote just proves we’re adept at protecting fragile egos as well 🙂

Sarcasm runs in my family, but we aren’t too mean about it. For instance, when I was waitressing in college, I worked at a restaurant that served breakfast. As I set the cruets of syrup on the table, this one man lifted up the brown liquid to the light and asked, “is this boysenberry syrup?” I said, “if you have a good imagination.” If I was mean, I could’ve said, ‘yeah, our boysenberry syrup is brown and smells like maple’. 🙂

nrhatch - June 2, 2014

Bwahaha!!! That’s the best come back to Connolly ever!

“If you have a good imagination” is a great line ~ subtle, gentle. and effective without being snarky. I am putting it into my box of linguistic tricks right now for future use (on the off-hand outside chance that someone sometime down the road somewhere asks me a question with an all-too-obvious answer). THANKS!

16. suzicate - June 2, 2014

Sarcasm runs rampant in my family…I only get to see all of them together once a year or so and you better believe the laughter and energy is at an all time high. I’m not as quick witted as two of my siblings (there were six of us, now five) so I watch in awe and laugh until my stomach hurts. I get a jab in now and then, but my best come backs are a bit too late!

nrhatch - June 2, 2014

Yay! That sounds much like our gatherings. My brothers are pros at subtle digs, double entendre, innuendo, and sarcasm. It’s a hoot to watch them have a conversation about anything at all . . . knowing that it’s all in jest.


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