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What’s The Use Of Worrying? September 30, 2011

Posted by nrhatch in Mindfulness, People, Poetry.
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Worry:  interest
paid on debts we may not owe.

Are you okay now?

Worry is a habit . . . an exhausting, energy draining habit. 

To break the chain and turn a downward spiral of thought into a more uplifting way to spend time,  focus on this moment.

If you’re okay right now . . . you’re okay.

Quote:  We either make ourselves miserable, or we make ourselves strong. The amount of work is the same. ~ Carlos Castaneda

Aah . . . that’s better!

Roseate Spoonbill by Richard Stewart ~ available at Island Gallery West.

Related posts:  Free From Worry, Stress, and Pressure (Reflections from a Friend) * Swimming Beneath The Current

Comments»

1. Judson - September 30, 2011

I’m trying … really I am! Thanks for the reminder.

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

I found myself worrying yesterday . . . and decided to give myself a reminder.

What’s the use of worrying? It doesn’t improve things one whit.

2. suzicate - September 30, 2011

Worrying tis of no use but to cause wrinkles upon the forehead…and really who WANTS those if we have a choice?!

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

Not me! Bad wrinkles.

I only want LAUGH lines, not FROWN lines.

3. kateshrewsday - September 30, 2011

Worry and I, we know each other well. It takes years of practice to put him in his place. I am just beginning to make some kind of headway. Onwards and upwards….

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

Worrying is an easy and comfortable habit to fall into . . . but, unless it spurs us to action, it is a waste of time and energy and steals from us the happiness we could otherwise be enjoying.

When we have conquered the enemy within, there are no enemies left to conquer.

4. Richard W Scott - September 30, 2011

I’ve been worrying you’d bring this up.

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

Now you can put your mind at ease . . . the worst has come to pass. :mrgreen:

5. sweetdaysundertheoaks - September 30, 2011

I’m trying too! Dang it is hard. Also working on negative thinking that seems to make its way out of my mouth. I feel my stomach churning when I am negative and I feel such a sense of peace when I give it a rest. I am clicking on the related post that is shown. Thank you for the motivation and the comments help too.

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

Breaking habitual thought patterns is difficult. First, we must tune in and watch our thoughts. Then, we must ask: Is it helpful? Is it true? It is inspiring me to action?

If not, we must reclaim the remote and mindfully change the channel.

The mind is a wonderful servant . . . and a terrible master.

When we master our thoughts, we master our life. Peace!

6. Piglet in Portugal - September 30, 2011

I worry a lot recently…I try not to, but worrying seems to be a compulsive past time at the moment. I worry about everything from money to GM food. Worrying is addictive. I try hard not to and give myself a good talking to as worry causes stress.
Stop it Pip…STOP! I need to go back to the ocean and find peace.

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

Worrying is addictive. And compulsive. And habit forming.

If you can’t get to the ocean, bring the ocean to you ~ float under the surface of the mental chatter until you find your wellspring of inner peace.

Aah . . . that’s better!

Piglet in Portugal - September 30, 2011

I don’t know about mental chatter, but I am drowning at the moment.

nrhatch - September 30, 2011
7. “A Starbuck Moment” …get meeeeeoww-t | Pocket Perspectives - September 30, 2011

[…] another good post this morning, “What’s the use of worrying,”  from Spirit Lights the Way.…..seems to be a common thread today… And since I’m […]

8. Pocket Perspectives - September 30, 2011

Ah yes…worry…I find it odd how easy it is for me to drift into worry…and how much awareness and effort it can take to get out of the habit…….”get meow-tt” indeed… maybe I’ll add a bit to that Starbuck page! 🙄

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

I find I worry more when I don’t give my mind something “better” to do. If I tell it to look around at THIS moment, my imagination stops loading up my wheelbarrow of worries and relaxes.

Aah . . .

9. BrainRants - September 30, 2011

Awesome quote.

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

Isn’t it? People struggling to break bad habits often complain, “it’s too hard” . . . right before “giving up” and reverting back to their old way of thinking.

It is difficult to change habitual patterns of thinking . . . but it’s worth it. After all, our FREEDOM is at stake.

10. Julie - September 30, 2011

Don’t worry, be happy.

That takes a LOT of practice. I’m getting better at it.

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

It does, indeed. Our thoughts have a mind of their own, and our imaginations get away from us at times, creating one worst case scenario after another. So tiring.

Here’s to creating Best Case Scenarios. 😀

11. Maggie - September 30, 2011

A wise man once said… the majority of things we worry about will never happen.

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

Very true. While we’re worrying about one thing . . . we get slam dunked by another. 😉

12. Patricia - September 30, 2011

For some of us there is less worrying when we get older and for some there is more. I am of the less category. But then I don’t think I could worry more than I did when young…

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

I’ve definitely grown less worried about trivia (such as what others think of me) as I’ve aged . . . but I’ve grown more worried about the future of the world because I am less distracted by trivia.

It’s a bit of a Catch-22. :mrgreen:

13. hugmamma - September 30, 2011

think i’ll be working on this bad habit…til the day my brain is laid to rest 6 feet under… 😉

nrhatch - September 30, 2011

I worry less (largely by turning my thoughts to more productive matters) but If I let down my guard, especially when tired or stressed, worry comes flooding back through the cracks with a vengence.

It is difficult to change our habitual patterns of thinking . . . but it’s worth it. After all, our FREEDOM is at stake.

14. walterwsmith3rd - October 1, 2011

Nice post, and thought provoking indeed. The law that things are always changing keeps me from worry most of the time.

nrhatch - October 1, 2011

Que sera, sera . . .
Whatever will be, will be . . .
The future’s not ours to see . . .
Que sera, sera.

15. Tilly Bud - October 1, 2011

I love that first quote.

nrhatch - October 1, 2011

I keep it at the ready when I start getting into a loop of worry about the far distant future . . . it reminds me to Stay Put!

16. 9/30 Free from worry, stress and pressure « Reflections From a Friend - October 1, 2011

[…] “What’s the use of worry?” Spirit Lights the Way  […]

17. spilledinkguy - October 1, 2011

So interesting that you’ve posted a photo of that Spoonbill!
I was just looking through some old photos and came across one just like it (only I had no idea what I was looking at)!
*Twilight Zone music playing softly*
🙂

nrhatch - October 1, 2011

Seriously? That is so cool. I love it when I need to know something and my attention is pointed in the right direction.

Spoonbills are beautiful birds and we are fortunate to have several that live in our neighborhood for part of the year.

18. Ronnie/Hurtled to 60 - October 2, 2011

I will carry those thoughts with me – thank you 🙂

nrhatch - October 2, 2011

I watch my thoughts . . . so they don’t run away with me. 😉

19. ElizOF - October 2, 2011

Don’t worry, be happy… I wonder what Bobby McFerrin’s up to… Must go look for him. 😉

nrhatch - October 2, 2011

Somewhat of a one hit wonder . . . but he had the right idea.

20. Judith - October 11, 2011

Yes I am OK. thanks.

nrhatch - October 11, 2011

Excellent! I really enjoyed your visit to the Met. 😀


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