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Photo Challenge ~ UP August 28, 2011

Posted by nrhatch in Art & Photography, Humor, Travel & Leisure, Word Play.
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Carl Jetson surveyed the area, noting the vegetation with interest.  Nothing like a change in perspective to shake things up a bit.

Sighing with satisfaction, he reached up to pull the rip cord and slow his descent, but his fingers closed around thin air.

He took one last look around . . .

What goes up . . . must come down. 

Related posts:  Weekly Photo Challenge ~ UP * Inspired Vision * The Laughing Housewife * Miss Whip Lash * ChittleChattle

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1. misswhiplash - August 28, 2011

Ha! Ha! and he got ea bit wet me thinks!!!

nrhatch - August 28, 2011

{{S~P~L~A~S~H}} 😛

2. Paula Tohline Calhoun - August 28, 2011

Ah hah! Another opportunity to comment with one of my “That reminds me” stories. . .

Jim, a young man, joined the Army, and signed up for the paratroopers unit. All the men in the unit were very well trained and prepared for their first jumps. They did the tower jumps, and the tandem jumps, etc. Then came the day for the first solo jump. Before taking off, their commander told them,

“Now, you are not to worry. Remember your training! Many procedures are in place to make sure your jump is safe. First, you will be told when it is safe to jump. After jumping you are to count to ten, slowly, take a deep breath, then pull the ripcord. Your chute will deploy. You will drift safely to the ground. After landing, get up, roll up your chute and wait for the truck, which will come and pick you up and take you, safe and sound, back to the base.

“If by some outlandish near-impossible happenstance, the chute does not open, DO NOT PANIC! Take a deep breath then pull the red “emergency chute” ring on the opposite side of your vest. The chute will deploy. You will drift safely to the ground. After landing, get up, roll up your chute and wait for the truck, which will come and pick you up and take you, safe and sound, back to the base.”

It was a beautiful, clear, and cloudless day. The plane took off. As the commander had said, each soldier was instructed when it was his turn to jump. Just before Jim’s turn to jump, his commander told him,

“Private – in just a moment it will be time you to take your first solo jump. Just to review the procedure with you, remember – when I tell you to jump, jump! Count to ten, slowly, take a deep breath, and pull the ripcord. Your chute will deploy, and you will drift slowly to the ground. After landing, get up, roll up your chute and wait for the truck which will come and take you, safe and sound, back to the base. Now, also remember, that if by some very slim chance the chute does not open, DO NOT PANIC! Take a deep breath then pull the red “emergency chute” ring on the opposite side of your vest. The chute will deploy, and you will drift safely to the ground. After landing, get up, roll up your chute and wait for the truck, which will come and pick you up and take you, safe and sound, back to the base. OK, now, ready?”

“Yes sir!” said the eager, trusting young private. “OK, Private! JUMP!” Jim jumped. He obediently counted to ten, slowly, took a deep breath, and pulled the ripcord. Nothing happened. He was still rapidly plummeting to the ground, to where he had been told he would safely land, get up, roll up his chute, and wait for the truck which would come and take him, safe and sound, back to the base. Had the commander lied? Of course not! Jim DID NOT PANIC! He took a deep breath, and pulled the red “emergency chute” ring on the opposite side of his vest. Again, nothing happened. He was rushing to meet the ground, at maximum velocity, and as he prepared to hit the ground, he ruefully thought, “And I bet there won’t be any truck to take me, safe and sound, back to the base, either!”

Believe it or not, that was a abbreviated version of the story – I edited it just for you! 😆

Now, on to write my last pre-blogattical post!. . .

nrhatch - August 28, 2011

I like my {{S~P~L~A~S~H}} better than your {{S~P~L~A~T}}.

Have FUN writing your pre-blogattical post! 😀

Paula Tohline Calhoun - August 28, 2011

You realize of course that hitting water at maximum velocity is the same as hitting concrete. . .

Neither one sounds particularly pleasant to me, and I agree that writing my pre-blogattical post sounds like a lot more fun. . . 😉

nrhatch - August 28, 2011

Yes. I do. But I pictured him landing with a gentle splash.

3. kateshrewsday - August 29, 2011

Fantastic. I must take a few lessons with you in brevity.

nrhatch - August 29, 2011

Thanks, Kate! For a time, I participated in several WEbook projects based on brevity, including Cinema 50:

http://www.webook.com/project/Cinema-50

Review the best in film and DVD, from cinema blockbusters to old time classics – films that made you laugh, scream or cry – but keep it short – only 50 words allowed!

Wonderful FUN recalling favorite films and distilling them to their essence . . . with including spoilers.

Your posts may not be brief . . . but they are a delight to read. Always!

4. Rufus' Food and Spirits Guide - August 29, 2011

Pretty funny one. Great picture too.

nrhatch - August 29, 2011

That photo is taken from a tower in Robinson Preserve, along the Manatee River . . . with the Sunshine Skyway Bridge in the distance.

A great spot to catch the sea breezes.

5. eof737 - August 30, 2011

That is a beautiful scene to revisit…. Where were you on this one? 😉

nrhatch - August 30, 2011

That photo is taken from a tower in Robinson Preserve, along the Manatee River . . . with the Sunshine Skyway Bridge in the distance.

A great spot to catch the sea breezes.

6. gospelwriter - August 31, 2011

A view to die for? 😉

nrhatch - September 1, 2011

Well put, Ruth. 😉

7. Weekly Photo Challenge: UP! | Mirth and Motivation - September 1, 2011

[…] Weekly Photo Challenge…UP (nrhatch.wordpress.com) […]

8. 2e0mca - September 1, 2011

Interesting take on the subject. Enjoyed Paula’s story too. Here’s a true one.

On my travels I got talking to a fellow pilot at Sibson. He was employed to take the parachutists up for their jumps in an old Cessna 206. On one occasion over the jump zone, after the students had left the plane, the parachute instructor leant over his shoulder and yanked out the ignition keys before gleefully leaping out the door with them…

Just as well we’re trained to deal with engine failures 🙂

nrhatch - September 1, 2011

OMG! Did the plane crash? Or was someone still on board to “glide” it down safely?

2e0mca - September 1, 2011

The pilot trimmed it and the brought it down safely to the airfield. Like I said – it’s what we’re trained to do 🙂 Cessna 206’s glide really well unlike my old PA28 – which glided slightly less well than a brick 😉 Still get her down safely though if the engine stops! I used to practise at least once a month – it was good fun to simulate engine failures between cross-country flights.

nrhatch - September 1, 2011

That’s very cool. Scary, but cool.


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